In this issue: Nature's real vampires, 8 great fall birding trails, winterizing for birds, and more.

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Audubon Newsletter
 

October 2013

 
8 Great Birding Trails | Noah Woods

(Illustration by Noah Woods)

Eight Great Fall Birding Trails

Autumn migration season is here. Millions of birds are on the wing, covering thousands of miles as they head south for the winter. Grab your favorite field guide and hit the road to see one of the greatest wildlife spectacles on earth. Read More→

common vampire bat | Joy VanBuhler/Flickr Creative Commons

Common Vampire Bat (Photo by Joy VanBuhler/Flickr Creative Commons)

Nature’s Real Vampires

With Halloween just around the corner, vampires will likely be popping up in your neighborhood soon. They’ll discard their fake fangs come November, but nature’s true bloodsuckers will carry on their pursuit of the nutritious, ubiquitous liquid meal. These sanguivores come in all shapes and sizes. See for yourself . . . if you dare. Read More→

winter birds | Getty Images

(Photos by Getty Images)

Welcome Winter Birds to Your Yard

The cooler weather is setting in, and now is the perfect time to create a winter wonderland for birds and get a jump on spring migration season. From cleaning out feeders to building a brush pile in a corner of your property to offer songbirds shelter in extreme weather, these nine steps are sure to win over your avian visitors. Read More→

Get Involved

John E. Amos coal-fired power plant, WV | Daniel Shea Barn Owl | Ian S/Flickr Creative Commons
 

John E. Amos coal-fired power plant, Winfield, West Virginia. (Photo by Daniel Shea)

   

Barn Owl. (Photo by Ian S/Flickr Creative Commons)

 

Speak Up!

Urge the EPA to Curb Carbon Pollution

Your comments were among the 4.2 million submitted to the EPA last spring in support of its groundbreaking rule to regulate greenhouse gases from new power plants. Now the agency is finalizing the rule. Tell the EPA you support strong carbon pollution regulations.

Take Action Now

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Owl Facebook Cover Photo Contest

Who-hoo-hoo likes owls? The birds abound this week on Audubon’s Facebook page, where fans are posting their owl photographs and voting for their favorite. The winning image will be featured as the cover photo on our Facebook page. Check out photos and submit yours now→

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